How to Handle the Coronavirus


Yes! Pavlik is Open and Ready for Appointments 

We will continue you to serve you and your needs as we adapt to this challenging time.  

At the Pavlik Center, we have made it a priority to be in full compliance with CDC guidelines and our facilities are ready for appointments:

  1. Waiting rooms: Sanitized and have socially distanced seating
  2. Patient rooms: Completely sanitized after each visit
  3. Providers: Adhere to the strictest sterilization protocols

Call our Medical Team:  If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call our medical provider team for medical advice:

CALL 407-447-2273


Coronavirus Illustration


Virtual Care: COVID-19 Response

If you’re like members of our Pavlik Center for Health & Wellness Team, you are receiving a steady flow of information about COVID-19. Virtual Care plays a key role within the management of this public health concern.  

The Pavlik Center for Health & Wellness Virtual Care Management platform can be used to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak. We hope that the recommendations below can be of value to you as we continue to research solutions that will allow increased access to care, while limiting transmission of the virus.


Virtual Medical Care Devices


Virtual Care

Talk to a medical provider from anywhere with your phone or web browser.

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Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below:  If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, follow the steps below to help protect other people in your home and community.

man in bed

Stay home except to get medical care

  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to recover at home. Do not leave, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you feel worse or you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.

family separated

Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as home isolation

  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific “sick room” and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just like you would around other people.
    • Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known.
    • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick with COVID-19. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with them. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

If someone in your home is sick

on the phone with doctor

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call your doctor’s office or emergency department, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.

man wearing a mask

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live in the home should stay in a different room. When caregivers enter the room of the sick person, they should wear a facemask. Visitors, other than caregivers, are not recommended.

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover your coughs and sneezes

  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

washing hands

Clean your hands often

  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option, especially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Handwashing tips

don't share

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share: Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.

cleaning a counter

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

Clean high-touch surfaces in your isolation area (“sick room” and bathroom) every day; let a caregiver clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in other areas of the home.

  • Clean and disinfect: Routinely clean high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom.
    • If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick person’s bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom.

High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

  • Clean and disinfect areas that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Household cleaners and disinfectants: Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.
    • Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
    • Most EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective. A full list of disinfectants can be found hereexternal icon.

Complete disinfection guidance

taking temperature

Monitor your symptoms

  • Seek medical attention, but call first: Seek medical care right away if your illness is worsening (for example, if you have difficulty breathing).
    • Call your doctor before going in: Before going to the doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do.
  • Wear a facemask: If possible, put on a facemask before you enter the building. If you can’t put on a facemask, try to keep a safe distance from other people (at least 6 feet away). This will help protect the people in the office or waiting room.
  • Follow care instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department: Your local health authorities will give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

alert icon

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before medical help arrives.


  1. If you are concerned that you have contracted the virus Building on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it is prudent to conduct a Virtual Care visit to initially assess whether or not you may have contracted the virus. In this way, the likelihood of transmission of the condition to third parties while in transit or at our facility is reduced, as is the likelihood of transmission to our staff of healthcare workers at our clinic.
  2. Confirmed Patients If you are confirmed to have the virus, you may be quarantined at home for treatment and surveillance. Routine check-ins and assessment visits can be completed via Virtual Care. With integrated e-prescribing, medications can be authorized and delivered to your home by a local or mail-order pharmacy. Understanding that you may need additional medical services, we built our cloud-based VCM platform to support rapid expansion, allowing other providers from other specialties to quickly begin using the platform to help meet your additional needs.   

General Transmission Risk Management
A significant current point of emphasis is initiation of strategies to control transmission of COVID-19 by those of you who are, or may be, infected; Virtual Care can be a powerful tool to achieve this goal. The use of the Pavlik Center for Health & Wellness VCM platform to treat non-virus related concerns can play a significant role in controlling transmission of the virus. By offering the option for suitable visits to be conducted virtually through the Pavlik Center for Health & Wellness VCM platform, patients can continue to receive necessary, non-virus related healthcare without leaving their homes and risking possible exposure to the virus.

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Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

7:30 am-6:30 pm

Tuesday:

7:30 am-6:30 pm

Wednesday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-1:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed